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Simbang Gabi at St. Lambert

16 Dec

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Simbang Gabi

Simbang Gabi is a Philippine tradition that was introduced by the Spanish friars to allow the farmers to hear mass before going to the fields early in the morning. It is also known by its popular Spanish name as the Misa de Gallo, or “Mass of the rooster”. Simbang Gabi means dawn mass. It’s a tradition that dates back to 1587. It was introduced by the Spanish Missionaries to encourage the faith of the Filipino people. It is a series of nine early morning Masses (novena), starting as early as 4:00a.m.

The tradition begins on December 16th and ends at midnight of December 24th (the Midnight Mass) with Noche Buena. During the Simbang Gabi days, most churches open their doors before the break of dawn to welcome church goers.

To wake people up, church bells start ringing as early as 3 o’clock in the morning. Bright Christmas lights and colorful parols (lanterns) decorate houses and the church.

Parols (Philippine Lanterns)

In the Philippines, the parol has become an iconic  symbol of the Filipino Christmas. A star-shaped paper lantern,  made of bamboo strips pasted with papel de japon (Japanese paper), illuminated by a candle or kalburo (carbide). The shape is said to be inspired by the star on the Nativity of Jesus that guided the Magi to the manger

Parols are associated also with the Simbang Gabi (Misa de Gallo) and also symbolize the victory of light over darkness and the Filipinos’ hope and goodwill during the Christmas season.

Parol was adapted by barrio folks to light their paths during this annual ritual dawn Masses, due to electricity being unavailable at the time. These then remain until January, traditionally removed after Epiphany, to honour the Three Kings and their visit to the Child Jesus. (  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parol)

St. Lambert Novena Mass

Join us in one of the Novena Masses of Simbang Gabi here in St. Lambert Parish in Skokie. The St. Lambert’s Simbang Gabi will be on December 20, Saturday at 6:30 in the evening.

A short cultural presentation and a “salu-salu” will follow the Mass.

Article source: St Lambert Parish Bulletin, http://en.wikipedia.org

O Come, Emmanuel

15 Dec

A Charlie Brown Christmas

14 Dec

Charles Schulz’s ‘Peanuts’ characters have become timeless classics.

Since it first aired in 1965, the beloved special has practically become required viewing for families celebrating the holiday season. Its message of anti-commercialism and good will towards man mixed with Schulz’s trademark humor of caustic kids in a cynical world is a perfect remedy for the holidays that can get sappier than your aunt’s homemade egg nog.

At the time of its airing, ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ received rave reviews, record ratings and an annual presence on television and home video for decades to come. And yet 46 years later, few fans know about its rocky beginnings that were fraught with much frustration and cynicism by the network executives who commissioned it and the producers who fought so hard to preserve Schulz’s humor and pathos.

ABC has announced their holiday special broadcast plan for “A Charlie Brown Christmas” which will be aired on December 16, 2014 (unedited) Tuesday, from 8 – 9 PM (Eastern/Pacific). It will be unedited and accompanied by the 2002 skit compilation Charlie Brown’s Christmas Tales.

Read the 10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’
By Danny Gallagher, thefw.com. CLICK HERE

The Greater Antiphons of Advent

13 Dec

Credit: usccb, fisheaters.com, catholiceducation.org

The “O Antiphons” (also called the “Greater Antiphons” or “Major Antiphons”) refer to the seven antiphons that are recited (or chanted) preceding the Magnificat during Vespers of the Liturgy of the Hours. They cover the special period of Advent preparation known as the Octave before Christmas, Dec. 17-23, a time which is called the “Golden Nights”, with Dec. 24 being Christmas Eve and Vespers for that evening being for the Christmas Vigil.

The Roman Church has been singing the “O” Antiphons since at least the eighth century. They are the antiphons that accompany the Magnificat canticle of Evening Prayer from December 17-23. They are a magnificent theology that uses ancient biblical imagery drawn from the messianic hopes of the Old Testament to proclaim the coming Christ as the fulfillment not only of Old Testament hopes, but present ones as well. Their repeated use of the imperative “Come!” embodies the longing of all for the Divine Messiah.

Each Antiphon begins with “O” and addresses Jesus with a unique title which comes from the prophecies of Isaias and Micheas (Micah), and whose initials, when read backwards, form an acrostic for the Latin “Ero Cras” which means “Tomorrow I come.”

These glorious titles for Christ are:

Sapientia – Wisdom
Adonai – Lord of Israel
Radix Jesse – Root of Jesse
Clavis David – Key of David
Oriens – Radiant Dawn, Dayspring
Rex Gentium – King of all Nations, King of the Gentiles
Emmanuel – God with us

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 17

O Wisdom of our God Most High,
guiding creation with power and love:
come to teach us the path of knowledge!

December 18

O Leader of the House of Israel,
giver of the Law to Moses on Sinai:
come to rescue us with your mighty power!

December 19

O Root of Jesse’s stem,
sign of God’s love for all his people:
come to save us without delay!

December 20

O Key of David,
opening the gates of God’s eternal Kingdom:
come and free the prisoners of darkness!

December 21

O Radiant Dawn,
splendor of eternal light, sun of justice:
come and shine on those who dwell in darkness and in the
shadow of death.

December 22

O King of all nations and keystone of the Church:
come and save man, whom you formed from the dust!

December 23

O Emmanuel, our King and Giver of Law:
come to save us, Lord our God!

Continue reading…

Sources: photo-catholiccuisine.blogspot.com, catholicnh.org articles – catholiceducation.org and fisheaters.com

St. John of the Cross

12 Dec

Credit: CCTN YouTube Channel, catholic.org

CCTN’s new series of short informational videos about our Catholic Saints and the lives they lived.

St. John of the Cross
Feastday: December 14

Simbang Gabi Schedule for the Archdiocese of Chicago

11 Dec

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Simbang Gabi is a Philippine tradition that was introduced by the Spanish friars to allow the farmers to hear mass before going to the fields early in the morning. It is also known by its popular Spanish name as the Misa de Gallo, or “Mass of the rooster”. Simbang Gabi means dawn mass. It’s a tradition that dates back to 1587. It was introduced by the Spanish Missionaries to encourage the faith of the Filipino people. It is a series of nine early morning Masses (novena), starting as early as 4:00a.m.

The tradition begins on December 16th and ends at midnight of December 24th (the Midnight Mass) with Noche Buena. During the Simbang Gabi days, most churches open their doors before the break of dawn to welcome church goers.

To wake people up, church bells start ringing as early as 3 o’clock in the morning. Bright Christmas lights and colorful parols (lanterns) decorate houses and the church.

Here in the US, Simbang Gabi Masses are celebrated usually in the afternoon or evening.

For the Simbang Gabi Schedule for the Archdiocese of Chicago, CLICK HERE